In conformity with the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, it is also the policy of Moore College of Art and Design not to discriminate on the basis of sex in its employment practices, educational programs or activities. The admission of only women in the undergraduate program is in conformity with a provision of the Civil Rights Act. The provisions of Title IX protect students, visitors, guests and employees from all forms of illegal sex discrimination, which includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual misconduct, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking in College programs and activities.

Rachel Phillips is the Deputy Title IX Coordinator. Rachel’s office is on Wilson 2nd floor, 215.965.4025, rphillips@moore.edu. Do not hesitate to reach out to either Title IX Coordinator with any possible Title IX violations.

All faculty and staff (including student workers) are considered “responsible employees” and must report any possible Title IX violation to a Title IX Coordinator. Should you wish to speak to someone confidentially, the only two staff members on campus who are not legally required to report violations are the Director of Health Services, Diane Azuma, and the Mental Health Counselors, Andrea Bernstein and Josephine Coppola. They are all located on the first floor of Stahl Hall.

You can find more information below and in Section 4 of the Student Handbook. 

Title IX is a federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, including sexual harassment and sexual assault, in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. On May 6, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education released sweeping regulations directing schools to implement a procedure to redress Title IX-based reports of sexual harassment and sexual assault. The regulations have gone into effect as of August 14, 2020.

Prescribed definitions of sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic and dating violence, and stalking that are prohibited under Title IX

The sexual harassment definition is narrower than previous definitions of sexual harassmentApplies to all complaints of Title IX prohibited conduct for all faculty, staff, and studentsSupportive measures available to complainants regardless of whether a matter is investigatedA signed complaint from the complainant (the person who is reported to have experienced harm) or the Title IX Coordinator as a predicate to an investigationA dismissal of a matter if the reported conduct falls outside of Title IX’s jurisdiction

Because the reported conduct does not fall within the defined conduct covered by Title IX; Because the reported conduct happened outside of the United States; Because the reported conduct did not occur within a College program or activity; or Because the complainant is not participating or seeking to participate in a College program or activity at the time of the filing of the complaint

A preponderance of the evidence standard. Preponderance of the evidence means that the alleged conduct more likely than not occurred.

A presumption of innocence for the respondent (the accused)

An investigation with the opportunity for parties (the complainant and respondent) to make a statement, provide witnesses, and present evidence

Parties may be accompanied by an advisor of their choice to any meeting or proceeding

In a matter involving a student bringing a complaint against a faculty or staff member, the College may not resolve the matter by agreement.

A hearing by a decision-maker(s)

At a hearing the parties have the following rights:

to be provided an advisor to object to evidence at the hearing witness statements from a party who is not available for cross-examination cannot be considered by the decision-maker to have their advisor cross-examine the other party and witnesses

Following a hearing, the parties have the following rights:

to receive a written outcome including the basis for the decision if there is a finding of responsibility, to receive written sanctions and remedies to appeal the decision of the decision-maker

Designated time frames for certain aspects of the procedure, including

10 business days to comment on evidence 10 business days to review the investigation report

The College can neither compel a party to participate in the Title IX Procedure nor retaliate against a party for not participating

The College cannot violate a party’s first amendment rights

To best effectuate the regulations, to ensure compliance with federal and state laws, and to ensure a fair process for Moore parties, Moore is in the process of finalizing a Policy with the following elements:

Parties are provided these options:

To be advised by a process navigator on all aspects of the procedure

At any stage of the procedure, to work with an advisor, who can be a professional legal expert, at a party’s own expense

In matters in which a faculty or staff member is making a complaint against a faculty or staff member, the matter must be resolved by agreement of the complainant, respondent, and a non-Moore professional legal expert.

For students: the hearing decision-maker will be the Dean of Students. The decision-maker will:

For students: the hearing decision-maker will be the Dean of Students. The decision-maker will:

  • Make evidentiary determinations
  • Make findings of responsibilities
  • Following a finding of responsibility, issue sanctions and remedies

For students: the decision-maker for appeal will be the President.

For faculty/staff: the hearing decision-maker will be a non-Moore professional legal expert. The decision-maker will:

  • Make evidentiary determinations
  • Make findings of responsibilities
  • Following a finding of responsibility, issue sanctions and remedies
  • For faculty/staff: the decision-maker for appeal will be a non-Moore professional legal expert.

Parties will be provided an option to waive cross-examination by their advisors and instead submit written questions to the hearing officer who will conduct the examination.

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