When Apr 10 - Apr 24

Throughout April, the 2021 candidates of Moore College of Art & Design’s Socially Engaged Art Program will showcase their work and skills in exhibits and online events!

Claire Eide and Megan Galardi: Virtual Conversation with Impractical Spaces

Please join Moore College of Art & Design's Socially Engaged Art Master's Candidates Claire Eide and Megan Galardi for a conversation with Impractical Spaces as we discuss artist-led projects across the country, exploring themes of collaboration and access in art making spaces. Register here.

Emily Elliott: Learning Chain

Learn freeform crochet while having a conversation about your experiences in educational institutions! Register here.

Ashley Ja'nae: Guided Tour of the 2021 MFA/MA Socially-Engaged Thesis Exhibition at Moore College of Art & Design

Experience a guided tour of the 2021 graduates of Moore College of Art & Design’s Socially Engaged Art Program. The artwork featured in the exhibition showcases the culminating work of four MFA students alongside a curated library selected by the MA graduates. Video coming soon.

Qiaira Riley: A Road Trip: An Artist Talk

In this conversation between sister-friends and artists Qiaira Riley and Animah Danquah, the two will share a soul food dinner, while sitting at a recreation of Riley’s grandmother’s kitchen table. They will discuss themes of food, migration, and ancestry as explored through Riley's Google Maps road trip from Chicago to Mississippi, inspired by her great grandmother’s travels during the Great Migration. A video piece including documentation of the road trip will be screened before the conversation. Register here.

Antoinette Liguori Sirianni: Be the Change

Be The Change is an eye-opening video that illustrates how we have all become unwitting participants in the sea of plastic pollution that is drowning our world, and how we need to make a change. In addition to the video, I have assembled a list of local petitions to engage my viewer, spread awareness and help them participate in the fight for our future and the future of our planet. View Be the Change online.

Exhibition Participants

Claire Eide

Claire Eide is an art educator and historian from unceded Sauk and Meskwaki land known as Des Moines, Iowa. She holds a BA in history with a focus on colonial theory from Grinnell College and continues to research colonial processes especially as it relates to art accessibility in rural places. Her academic and pedagogical pursuits are grounded in collaboration and process-based making.


Emily Elliott

Emily Elliott is a driven art educator with 20 years of experience. She has taught all levels, from infant to adult, in subjects ranging from rock climbing to health to fiber art. She considers herself a teacher first and an art specialist second. Emily holds a BS in art education from Kutztown University. She is in the MFA in Socially Engaged Art program, where she is focusing on teaching as an artistic practice.

Megan Galardi

Megan Galardi is an arts researcher and advocate from Philadelphia, PA. She has an undergraduate degree in growth and structure of cities from Bryn Mawr College. She is interested in themes of creative placemaking and the way that the arts can shape cities and communities. Her research focuses on artist-run spaces and grassroots arts organizations in Philadelphia.

Ashley Ja'nae

Ashley Ja'nae is an interdisciplinary teaching and visual artist and a Libra. She creates imagery centered around notions of belonging, identity and intimacy through Black people's relationship with hair, ourselves and our communities. With classic hip-hop instrumentals playing in the background, she facilitates art-learning experiences for young people to develop a stronger sense of self. Ja'nae, the only daughter of Melissa Morris, Dorothy's daughter, was born and raised in Wards 1 and 7 in Washington DC. She received her BFA in art and design education from Pratt Institute and is currently pursuing her MFA in Socially Engaged Studio Art at Moore. Ja'nae has exhibited her work in New York City, the Washington metropolitan area, and Prague, among other locations. She is a former member of the DC Arts Center Sparkplug collective, an aggressive bike rider, a black cat owner/pal.

Qiaira Riley

Qiaira Riley is a Sagittarius, fourth-generation Chicago native, and interdisciplinary artist based in Philadelphia. She holds a dual-major BA with honors from Lake Forest College in African studies and studio art, and is currently a Socially Engaged Studio Art MFA candidate at Moore. Her academic, curatorial and creative work explores archiving, Black women's cooking phenomenology, ancestral veneration, internet art, care and simulacra.

Among other projects, Riley is currently working on the Princess Pamela Project, a community cooking series, where she acts as a surrogate descendant to chef and restaurateur Princess Pamela, and attempts to recreate each recipe from her 1969 soul food cookbook 12 times with 12 different people.

Antoinette Liguori Sirianni

Antoinette Liguori Sirianni is an environmentally minded artist, mother and student who is passionate about the consequences of single-use plastic pollution on our planet. She manipulates these nonrecyclable bits into tactile installations that raise awareness of the consequence these materials are having on our planet, and our unwitting participation. Sirianni believes in process over product, using her sculptural voice to shout out the dangers of this colossal plastic pandemic.

Following her BFA from Fashion Institute of Technology, Sirianni worked for over 20 years as a graphic designer and art director in New York City and Philadelphia. As an MFA candidate at Moore, her practice now mainly focuses on sculpture and experimentation surrounding the disposal and the ultimate end of life of these “forever” items. Sirianni creates art that magnifies the issue and illustrates the peril of this ever-growing crisis. Using these materials as a solution, she challenges her audience to understand their responsibility regarding these plastics and the imperative of keeping them out of the waste stream by coming up with “end of life” solutions at their beginning of life.

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