VISIONARY WOMEN: MEG SALIGMAN & DR. MARY SCHMIDT CAMPBELL

September 10 – October 29, 2016
We are pleased to honor both Visionary Women Awardees Meg Saligman and Dr. Mary Schmidt Campbell with presence in The Galleries’ fall exhibition season. Saligman’s Common Ground features a site-specific installation that was presented in Cleveland at the 2016 Republican National Convention and then at the Free Library of Philadelphia during the Democratic National Convention here in Philadelphia. Common Ground is a non-partisan "artistic intervention" that explores how civic engagement and politics contribute to the public good. Dr. Campbell is an acclaimed art historian whose accomplishments as a writer, editor and scholar are celebrated through essays, catalogues and books on display in The Galleries’ publication space.

ALTERED STATES: FACULTY TRIENNIAL

September 17 – December 10, 2016

Showcasing the diversity of work created by the artists and designers that teach at Moore College of Art & Design, the 2016 iteration of this tri-annual presentation includes a curated selection of faculty works in a wide range of media that examine elements of the fantastic, explore transformation and different states of consciousness, are dramatically impacted by their context, and inform and/or initiate social change. Curated by John Caperton, Jensen Bryan Curator at The Print Center Philadelphia, the exhibition is complemented by a series of talks that provide a forum for Moore's faculty to discuss their practice & process and to present their research & expertise.


MAPPING THE STAGE: MICAH DANGES AND JAMES JOHNSON

September 17, 2016 – January 7, 2017
Informed in part by the formal and perceptual qualities of Fra Angelico’s fifteenth-century painting, The Healing of Justinian by Saint Cosmas and Saint Damian, Micah Danges and James Johnson’s window-front installation investigates new ways of making work with tangible, non-photographic materials and celebrates the power of inanimate objects. The project expands Danges’ and Johnson’s mutual interest in the pre-photographic representation of temporality in Renaissance painting, the relationship between images and objects – notably, the point at which the physical world ends and the image begins – and the unconventional use of photographic materials, processes and ideas.