Moore Student Runs Peace Paper Project Workshop


Victoria Lattanzi is leading the charge to turn clothing into paper for a good cause.

Under her direction, Moore College of Art & Design is hosting the first-ever Peace Paper Project Workshop in Philadelphia this week. It consists of taking articles of clothing that hold significant meaning and turning them into paper. It is a Panty Pulping workshop, however, participants can use other articles of clothing that have significance as well.

Lattanzi is a junior Fine Arts major with a minor in business and textiles. She is also the recipient of the Frieda Fehrenbacher Leadership Award. For her leadership fellowship, she knew she wanted to combine her love of fine arts and fiber with art therapy.

“I knew that I was eventually looking to go into art therapy, which I plan on getting a Master’s degree in,” she said. “I came across the Peace Paper Project and thought that what they were doing – using fiber arts as social action – was absolutely perfect.”

Peace Paper Project was started in 2011 by Drew Matott and Margaret Mahan as a project that would perpetuate the art of traditional hand papermaking by bringing it to vulnerable populations across the globe. Peace Paper Project's outreach program,
Panty Pulping, is embarking on a tour across the United States and Europe this summer/fall. Each stop along the way will be characterized by that community's intention to end sexual and domestic violence.

The paper making process goes like this: First, you cut up the panties or other articles of cloth into pieces. That then gets put through a Hollander beater, a machine that takes the cloth and transforms it into pulp. The pulp is then put into a large vat of water and gets drained through a mold and deckle, a type of screen that traps the fibers inside. The fibers are flipped onto a piece of felt, pressed and eventually dried into paper. If the participants want, they can do screen printing afterwards. The paper can also be bound into a book.

Some of the workshop participants will be creating journals to donate to Women Organized Against Rape (WOAR), Lattanzi said.

“I’m really excited about this whole process of paper making so as an artist it has been very fulfilling to reach out to an organization and feel so embraced by them right away,” she said. “In addition, I’m getting a lot of experience with the skills and machinery that I’m going to work with down the road. So as a student it has been very enriching. As far as leadership, I never realized the commitment and marketing and organization that factor into getting an event off the ground, so this has made me more of a leader, too.”

Read more about the Panty Pulping event at Moore.

About Peace Paper Project: Peace Paper Project was started in 2011 by Drew Matott and Margaret Mahan as a project that would perpetuate the art of traditional hand papermaking by bringing it to vulnerable populations across the globe. Peace Paper works in collaboration with art therapists, universities, art centers, and community participants to establish systems of papermaking as self-expression and trauma intervention. Peace Paper Project practices art in the social sphere by engaging individuals with papermaking using fibers of special and personal significance. These fibers tend to relate directly to the social issues being addressed. Ultimately, Peace Paper Project is interested in the intersection of art therapy with art as social action, and uses traditional hand papermaking to facilitate this connection. http://www.peacepaperproject.org/

About Panty Pulping and the 2013 tour: This fall, Peace Paper Project's outreach program Panty Pulping will embark on a tour across the United States and Europe. Each stop along the way will be characterized by that community's intention to end sexual and domestic violence. On one level, we will be transforming underwear into paper in the public sphere as a way of combating rape culture. On another level, we will be visiting domestic abuse shelters and holding papermaking as trauma therapy workshops in collaboration with art therapists.  Now more than ever presents itself as the time to demand an end to violence against women and girls, and to advocate for the global advancement of women. We at Peace Paper Project do so in our own way, utilizing traditional hand papermaking to engage communities in expressions of resilience and empowerment. http://www.pantypulping.org/



 

Published on July 16th, 2013