Visionary Woman Honors Program

  • 2015 Visionary Woman Honors Program
  • vwa scholars 2014 1495

Are you an ambitious individual who wants an opportunity to further your professional and personal development during your time at Moore?

If so, the Visionary Woman Honors Program is just the thing for you to gain experiences in entrepreneurship, leadership, service, and more, and you’ll receive a $20,000 per year scholarship. This rewarding program will enhance your education as you create your own personal journey which may include engaging with working artists, volunteering with community leaders and service organizations, mentoring under professors, hearing from guest speakers, and team building with student colleagues. Upon completion of the program, you’ll have created a network of peers and professionals that will give you an edge and help you be successful after graduation.

Admission to the Visionary Woman Honors Program is competitive. Approximately 15 first year students are admitted each year. To be considered for the Visionary Woman Honors Program, a student must have achieved a cumulative high school GPA of 3.5 or higher and a combined new SAT Critical Reading and Math minimum score of 1180 (not including the Writing score) or a 24 (composite score) for the ACT. Those who meet the criteria will be invited to interview with the VWHP committee beginning in October. Decisions regarding admission to the Visionary Woman Honors Program will be finalized on a rolling basis. Students who are admitted to the program will receive a $20,000 per year scholarship.

For more Information, please contact the Admissions office at
enroll@moore.edu or 215-965-4015

 

REFLECTIONS FROM STUDENTS ABOUT THE IMPACT OF THE PROGRAM

“From working with Amy Pickett I learned more about autism than [I had previously known]. The children's behavior varied because each child had different social cues he/she responded to while others didn't understand or would need a different cue. Just like other people, the autistic students were outgoing, shy, etc., but they had different approaches to communicating with people. I didn't see any disability but great ability with observing and occasionally talking to them. It also made me think that I must take locations into consideration when practicing art therapy.” Hannah Moy

“All of the events had things that could teach me about leadership, but they all had something to teach about finances or entrepreneurship too. The mission trip and the Artsphere job taught me about what it takes financially, resource wise, and what it takes in man power, as a lot goes into these things to even make them function.” Juliana Leventhal 

“Dan Gneiding… started out working for Anthropology and then Urban Outfitters, designing logos and labels for the companies. He talked about how Urban Outfitters does not have a set logo, so he was allowed a lot of creativity to come up with new ways of designing for their products. He later designed both the fonts “Ribbon” and “Dude” which are featured on the website losttype.com. He showed us how he makes a lot of variations of his fonts so that people can find just what they need for their project. He also showed us a video that was made as a promotion for his font “Dude”, which was stop animation of a sign painter painting the various letters to highlight the differences in the font families he had made. This was a cool like into the different ways that graphic design and illustration can be used, and I liked learning about his job at Urban Outfitters, because it was actually a studio setting for illustrators/graphic designers. I think I would enjoy working in that kind of setting.” Katie Brubaker

Above photo of 2015 Visionary Woman Awards Program scholars by Academic Image, along with a photo of scholars from 2014.